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August 21, 2009

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Ryan Clark

Or get a 5lbs (~1 gallon) propane tank and connector hoses. The tank is refillable, and you'll pay about 10 times LESS for the propane!

John Gallagher

Glad to see Coleman taking the lead on this concern, helping to make recycling of these canisters much easier. They should advertise this!

strusz

when are they going to make them refillable? Not everyone wants
to lug around a propane tank

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The green key that comes with the canister allows you to make sure all the remaining gas is expelled, thereby averting disaster and making it safe to recycle.

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Glad to see Coleman taking the lead on this concern, helping to make recycling of these canisters much easier. They should advertise this!

Jim S

Coleman is discontinuing the Green key due to lack of recycler participation: http://www.coleman.com/coleman/recycle/cylinder_dis.asp

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Yep, they should advertise this really hard in order to make a difference !

Glass Recycler

And how environmentally friendly is a green key that expels propane into the environment? Read what Yellowstone National Park developed to deal with 25,000 Coleman cylinders going in the landfill annually. Coleman developed the green key after declining to help YNP develop the first propane canister recycling unit in the world. YNP needed $50,000, but Coleman chose to develop their own for $500,000! "The world’s first propane bottle recycling unit was in Yellowstone
In 2004, the Park partnered with the Yellowstone Park Foundation and several other public and private entities to create the world’s first unit to recycle the small propane canisters used in camp stoves and lanterns. The device safely prepares used propane gas canisters for recycling and is powered by the residual gas found in each propane cylinder. To date, it has been used to recycle more than 20,000 propane canisters and the program has now been adopted by other national parks, state parks, and municipalities throughout the country." http://www.ypf.org/yes/
Thank Amerigas and REI for funding this project. They are now working with Montana State University to develop a similar machine for bear spray.

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the information of this post is very relevant
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joe smith

In 2009, The Coleman Company included a Green Key® tool with each of our propane canisters. We used the Green Key® program as a way to increase empty propane canister recycling. Unfortunately, the program was not accepted by many recycling agencies across the country. As a result, the Green Key® tool will no longer be included with the purchase of our Coleman® propane cylinders.

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Ken Harris

Great information. I found it very usefull. Time to go solar.

Ken Harris

There are hundreds of products that are run by solar energy. From Lamps to Fans. Time to make some changes

Noah

Www.RecycleAerosol.com

We recycle all types of propane tanks.

All gases are captured. Eliminating all emissions to the atmosphere.

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I seldom use propane canisters for camp stoves, I would use charcoal instead. It may produce more pollutants but it has nothing left behind to be recycled.

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Thank you for the article, my wife and I were having this same issue this summer while camping. I will have to look for the green canisters.

L-Arginine

Acutally I like Ryan's post about getting a propane tank. This will solve my issue and save me money at the same time. Weird I never thought of that

D

Why does man make things so hard. These things are made from metal and can be melted down and made right back into propane canister's. As usual it all comes down to money. How much effort does it take releive the pressure or excess gas from one of those canister's to make it safe? I hunt and fish and we us propane gas canister's. I have serveral empty one's in the garage that I would like to get rid of but, I don't just want to throw them out in the trash.

Brad S.

Old single use Propane tanks can be recycled at your local household hazardous waste facility- check the CalRecycle website to find them in CA. Better yet- you now CAN buy legally refillable camping propane cylinders at
www.propane-refill.com
They pay for themselves in about six uses and there is nothing to recycle because you are going one environmentally step further and reusing them! Feel free to contact me.

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